Addicted to Your Smartphone? Infographic

Smart Phone Addiction - Lovelace

Smart Phone Addiction – Lovelace

Great infographic by Lovelace Health System

Sources:
Pew Research Center, Smart Phone Usage
Huffington Post, Smart Phone Addiction Time Survey
The Telegraph, Smart Phones Hardly Used for Calls
LA Times, Survey: 59% of People Would Reach into a Toilet to Retrieve a Phone
ESoftLoad, Smartphone Statistics and Side Effects

What did you just call me?!

A South Korean campaign against smartphone addiction involves warning kids in classrooms that too much internet use makes them “mindless slaves” or “losers.”
More than 80% of kids aged 12 to 19 were found to have a smartphone in 2012, double from 2011.
Losers!

read more: http://www.thefix.com/content/south-korea-fights-digital-addiction-school-speakers91860

What do you do when your battery runs out?

“If your iPhone’s battery, God forbid, ever runs out, and you have left your spare charger in your car and you’ve lent out your other spare, you find yourself having a nervous breakdown” – Jessica Poter, considers that to be one of the worst and scariest symptomps of a smartphone addiction.
I personally think that bumping into strange people on the street is alot more disturbing.

To read more from jessica http://www.smosh.com/smosh-pit/articles/9-signs-youre-iphone-addict

Andy Bailey: Cellphone can be more a distraction than a tool

Andy Bailey is telling us how he felt when his smartphone was stolen on the way to a conference:

For the first 24 hours, I felt textbook withdrawal: I was anxious, disoriented and a little scared.

He observed himself for the next few days, and of what he named as Cellular Compulsive Disorder (or CCD). Then he got to some positive conclusions:

We can survive without our phones. I’ll admit, when I realized I was phoneless, I panicked. My travel tickets, hotel reservations, calendar and itinerary were all stored in my phone. Further, without apps such as AroundMe or Google Maps, how was I going to choose a place to eat or navigate in a foreign country?

After a momentary freakout, I regrouped. Turns out, airline kiosks can still print your tickets, hotels have your reservations on file, and you can access your calendar and itinerary from any computer. For restaurant suggestions or directions, I resorted to asking the locals — worked like a charm.

• The CCD afflicted are obnoxious. I began my 90-minute speaking sessions by asking the audience of entrepreneurs to turn off their phones. Sure enough, minutes later, I’d be at the crux of a point and a phone would ring. If it wasn’t a disruptive ring tone, I’d look into the crowd and notice several texters completely zoning me out….

• After my personal CCD recovery, I participated in more in-person conversation than I had in years. Since I couldn’t fill my extra time buried in the virtual world, I re-entered the real world. I met fantastic people, and our conversations delved beneath the surface. I experienced true engagement. It was a beautiful thing…

• A CCD-free life bolsters productivity. Although we all rationalize we can accomplish more with our contacts and reference materials in the palm of our hand, it’s not true. If you’re like me, and most I witnessed during my CCD-free week, you’re using your smartphone as a distraction rather than a work tool…

I recommend reading the full piece here.

Source: tennessean.com

// Lior Frenkel

Making fake phone calls?

Have you ever pretended to be talking on your phone just to avoid something or better yet, someone? it seems to be the most deadly symptom of smartphone addiction according to lifeteen.com.
Next time, maybe talking to the creep coming on to you on the bus in not as bad as the alternative.

read more http://lifeteen.com/the-5-phrases-cell-phone-addict/

Understatement of the year

The Child Welfare League Foundation survey revealed nothing new by presenting a shocking 36 percent of respondents saying they would feel unhappy, anxious or angry if they could not use their phone. So, you are warning us about smartphone addiction. Tell me more.

no, really, tell me more http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2013/07/17/2003567305

No more newspapers in the toilet

The next step in smartphone addiction- toilet texting. According to a new study, the magazines and newspapers have lost their appeal in the bathrooms among 75% of the american people. Nothing says “i missed you”, like a good old fashion text from the toilet of a loved one.

ToiletTexting-infographic

ToiletTexting-infographic

read more http://www.sociableblog.com/2012/03/07/toilet-texting-smartphone-addiction/