Help Us Convince Developers to Make Less Addictive Apps

We are all addicted to Smartphones.

But it’s not only our fault. Just like with tobacco, coca-cola and other addictive products, the other side – the producers – are also responsible for the addiction.

I have an amazing opportunity to speak at one of the biggest Internet conferences this year – WebSummit, Ireland, 2013. In my talk I will convince app developers and entrepreneurs why they should make less addictive apps for us, the users.

Lior Frenkel WebSummit

Lior Frenkel WebSummit

But in order to speak there, I need your help

Get into this link, watch my video and press “Like”. It should take a minute of your time, but this is for a great purpose. Spreading the word about UNDIGITIZE.ME.

You can also help by clicking on this link to tweet the message: http://clicktotweet.com/28T06

I must remind you, that this is a non-profit project, so we need your good will support whenever possible.

Thanks…

// Lior Frenkel

Your smartphone and your eyes

The negative social and cognitive influences lurking around the corner due to intensive Smartphone use are probably evident and clear by now to most of you intelligent birds out there, but what about the physical hazards?

Most of us spend the majority of our awakening hours in front of the computer. Combine your office hours with your after work Social media hours and add to that your approximate total daily Smartphone use count. Are you afraid to even calculate this equation? So do us.

eye safety

Repetitive strain injuries (RSI) are injuries to the skeletal system and nervous systems caused by repetitive tasks. Eye strain is one of the most common RSI injuries among Smartphone users.

When we stare at the screen in front of us, we blink much less than naturally. Decrease in blink rate causes dry eyes and is one of the top factors to cause headaches. Eye strain is known for the negative effect to our vision and is also likely to cause neck and shoulder pain.

Scared yet? Have no fear! CNN as well as LifeHacker community have adopted an easy method to avoid potential damage: The simple 20-20-20 rule.

This Optometrist and eye doctor supported method suggests that every 20 minutes we take an at least 20 second break in which we shall gaze at an object that is 20 feet (6 meters) away. This is the recommended distance in which our eyes relax and restore focus. Maintaining this habit should help us avoid the unwanted potential damage mentioned above.

Optometrist Dr.Glazier also suggests intensive users consulting to an eye doctor regarding potential adjustments need to be made, limiting the usage, keeping a healthy distance from the screen (elbow to wrist distance – minimum) and taking the time to adjust brightness and contrast according to your personal feeling.

// Noy Tamarkin

Why Writing A Children’s Book is our New Project

Our kids are addicted to screens. TV, computer screen, tablet or Smartphone – kids can spend up to 75% of their day playing with one or the other.

Whenever I visit my nephews, I experience how strong this addiction can be. My 2 year old nephew is browsing the YouTube app on the iPad almost as fast as I do. Well, this is amazing, and I admire this little smart guy, but I have problems to communicate with him because his attention span is so short.

A few months back I started UNDIGITIZE.ME first and foremost for myself. I am addicted to the Smartphone, and I wanted to find ways to get my life back. The deeper I dig, I get to the real problems – and kids’ addiction to screens is one of them. Now, with the “Phone Faced Down” campaign, on family dinners we are no longer allowing the kids to play with any of the screens, and we see the change immediately. They cry and cry for half an hour, but then they get creative and play with us. So I get to know my nephew more and more.

But influencing my own family is not enough – I feel that I want to make a real change. I want more kids, and more parents get aware to the screens addiction. I want the message to spread – that is the whole purpose of UNDIGITIZE.ME. I want parents to discuss it with each other and with their kids. Understanding the good and the bad in the screens. What we can gain, but also what we lose when we are “screening” ourselves so much.

With that in mind, I’m ready for the next challenge – spreading the word to the kids. And what is a better way doing that, than creating a children’s book, that will inspire them – not preaching to them – to try and visit the world outside the screens a bit more. To explore the abundance in the physical world, more than they do today.

I will share this beautiful journey with you in the next few weeks and months.

 

// Lior Frenkel

To read more about kids and tech addiction, try Michael’s guest post.

Are You A “Phone Potato”?

A new study by researchers at Kent State University found a link between heavy smartphone use and reduced fitness levels among university students.

Phone Potato

Phone Potato

Researchers Andrew Lepp and Jacob E. Barkley, associate professors in Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services, found college students who reported the highest smartphone use – averaging 14 hours a day – were less fit than those who used the devices less often.

“There’s no ‘phone potato’ term, but maybe there should be,” Barkley said. “We’re just scratching the surface here. I don’t think they think about the consequences of sitting and playing with your phone.”

Well, that’s a whole new meaning for the term “Digital Diet”…

Read more here.

 

// Lior Frenkel