Your smartphone and your eyes

The negative social and cognitive influences lurking around the corner due to intensive Smartphone use are probably evident and clear by now to most of you intelligent birds out there, but what about the physical hazards?

Most of us spend the majority of our awakening hours in front of the computer. Combine your office hours with your after work Social media hours and add to that your approximate total daily Smartphone use count. Are you afraid to even calculate this equation? So do us.

eye safety

Repetitive strain injuries (RSI) are injuries to the skeletal system and nervous systems caused by repetitive tasks. Eye strain is one of the most common RSI injuries among Smartphone users.

When we stare at the screen in front of us, we blink much less than naturally. Decrease in blink rate causes dry eyes and is one of the top factors to cause headaches. Eye strain is known for the negative effect to our vision and is also likely to cause neck and shoulder pain.

Scared yet? Have no fear! CNN as well as LifeHacker community have adopted an easy method to avoid potential damage: The simple 20-20-20 rule.

This Optometrist and eye doctor supported method suggests that every 20 minutes we take an at least 20 second break in which we shall gaze at an object that is 20 feet (6 meters) away. This is the recommended distance in which our eyes relax and restore focus. Maintaining this habit should help us avoid the unwanted potential damage mentioned above.

Optometrist Dr.Glazier also suggests intensive users consulting to an eye doctor regarding potential adjustments need to be made, limiting the usage, keeping a healthy distance from the screen (elbow to wrist distance – minimum) and taking the time to adjust brightness and contrast according to your personal feeling.

// Noy Tamarkin

Don’t text while watching a movie – the ninjas will get you

The Prince Charles Cinema in Londons Leicester Square is taking matter in their own hands by employing so-called ninjas to stop rude texters. A semi questionable method, but at list they look great in leotard.

Cinema-Ninja

read more http://www.slashfilm.com/wtf-london-theater-employing-volunteer-ninjas-to-confront-rude-moviegoers/

Ten Smartphones in my Bed… What a Nightmare!

“After our last talk about the Digital Diet,  I dreamt that I sleep with ten smartphones around me in bed… they were so heavy I couldn’t move them around or even pick them up…

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[still in the dream] I woke up, and then we had a discussion about the conspiration theory of how Apple, Google and Facebook intend to turn my pillow into a huge advertisement space, and that I will never be able to sleep again anymore!”

Tal Halevi, Tel-Aviv, Israel

Brands are Getting It

Have a short break from your connected life…

Check out this amazing campaign by Kit Kat. Their ongoing tagline is “Have a break, have a Kit Kat”. So since we have zero breaks these days – because we are constantly connected, Kit Kat came up with this brilliant project. They placed “No-Wifi” zones on social places in Amsterdam. In these zones you can’t be plugged in to the network, so voila – you must really listen to your friends, and watch the street go by.

Here’s the nice video they done for promoting the campaign:

A New Book Describes Internet Addiction in Greece

As described in Phantis, Greek Internet addicts are spending an average of 42 hours per week on the Internet, according to a new book in Greek by a seasoned police officer heading a cybercrime subdivision of the Athens police. According to data in the book addicted people have used the Internet for six years on average before being diagnosed, while the majority are addicted to Internet games specifically (97%). Internet addicts log on mostly at home (79%), at Internet cafes (67%) and at school (17%).

In 72% of cases, psychiatrically-diagnosed symptoms follow addiction.

 

Kids and Internet Addiction – What is the Way To Go?

Last week I bumped into another post about Internet Addiction and kids. Written by Liz Quilty on Google Plus, this post suggests a very common method to stop kids from getting addicted to the Internet – to unplug it.

Quoting Liz Quilty:
Its great that you let your kids use your digital devices, but how much of the day do they spend on them? or TV? or anything else?
Having seen this first hand, i can assure you its a real addiction, and adults have this as well as a lot of teenagers. It’s not a nice thing to have to get over, or to see somebody else from suffering with.
Luckily its an easy one to get over, take a holiday away for a couple of weeks, make sure there is no internet or cell coverage. Go tramping, go overseas, or heck, even unplug the router and post it in the mail to yourself for a few days peace 🙂

Well, I think that’s the wrong way to go.

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China plans policies against internet addiction

China plans policies against internet addiction

China is doing it wrong. Policies for not using the web will not get people less addicted, but will lead them to find new ways to reach the Internet.

”You can forbid the internet, but young people will still find a way online,” he says, noting that this generation grew up with the computer. The only way to remove the attraction, Pi says, would be if peer pressure started to make it unfashionable to spend a whole day in front of the computer.”

Do you think it’s possible to make it unfashionable? Or even needed? I think not. The solution shouldn’t come from “use less”, it should come from “use in a smart way”